Andres Pico Adobe

Andres Pico Adobe


If you head over to Mission Hills in the San Fernando Valley, at the junction of Sepulveda and Brand Blvd, you’ll find a historical home called the Andres Pico Adobe (http://www.sfvhs.com/AndresPicoAdobe2.htm). It’s the second oldest home in the City of Los Angeles, first built in 1834 by the Indians of the Ex-San Fernando Mission. It is uncertain as to what the building was first used for, but it was acquired by Andres Pico along with land and the old mission in the area. He eventually passed it to his son, who lived there for a while before moving away and renting the home out. By the 1920’s it was all but an abandoned shanty, used occasionally by vagabonds.

In the late 1920’s a museum curator by the name of Mark R. Harrington fell in love with the near-ruined adobe and worked to save the landmark by restoring it to the way it would have been when Andres Pico first remodeled it. Harrington sold the house in 1945 to some close friends who completed another refurbishing of the home. In 1957, it was purchased by the North Valley Y.M.C.A and some changes were made to adapt the structure to a business office and when they put it up for sale in 1965, the San Fernando Valley Historical society campaigned to save the landmark and it is now owned by the City of Los Angeles and run by the Department of Parks and Recreation with the help of the Historical Society.

The home boasts a collection of furniture, china, silver and other artifacts, as well as a library that is house in Harrington’s study. The Historical Society hosts tours, breakfasts and special events at the Adobe and if you visit on the weekend or as a group, the docents will greet you in period costume. A visit to the Andres Pico Adobe is a great way to see a piece of San Fernando Valley’s cultural history.




Fair
51°
Fair