Universal City

Universal City


Universal City encompasses the 415 acres that make up the property of Universal Studios. A majority of this San Fernando Valley community has remained unincorporated as to avoid City of Los Angeles business taxes and regulations. Universal City is predominantly comprised of a 36-floor office building for both Universal and NBC, the Sheraton Universal Hotel, the Universal Studios theme park and the adjacent Universal Citywalk, as well as the Gibson Ampitheatre and all of Universal’s sound stages, sets and back lots.

Just across the street from this compound is a Metro Rail Red Line, offering easy access to Hollywood and Downtown Los Angeles to the south, and North Hollywood and other parts of the Valley to the north. Universal City also has the only paid government operated fire station that falls on private property, Station 51, which is directly across the street from Universal Plaza. There’s a significance to the station number designated to the fire department. In the Universal television series, Emergency!, Station 51 was the fictional fire station in the show.

Universal City became official on March 15m 1915 when it was formed as a filming community by Carl Laemmle, a German immigrant first came to the U.S. via New York City to join the motion picture business and then made his way west. He had opted to consolidate his filming efforts that were spread out in Hollywood and in the Valley into one location, a haphazard “city,” that boasted a zoo, a post office and even a soda fountain. He encouraged visits by holding tours throughout the facility. With the advent of talking films in the 1920’s, tours of the studio ceased and it didn’t become a tourist destination again until 1964, which quickly brought with it the rise of hotels, a movie complex and eventually today’s CityWalk.




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